EVERYTHING VEGAN

April 17, 2014 10:25 pm

Shit vegans have to deal with - Part 1

Oh humans, you never cease to amaze me. Why would anyone write me a message telling me how they love ‘their’ meat? I mean.. WHY?! The internet is so vast, so amazing, so many interesting things to look for, read, watch, and you decide to contact me and let me know how much you like eating meat :*Do I *YAWN* *SCREAM* *CRY* and/ or LAUGH?

But it gets ‘funnier’, this person had the urge to tell me how open she is to try new food, but the moment I sugget that he tries some vegan food she goes like: “I SAID I LIKE MEAT! Meat analogues are so disgusting, they make my sensible, precious little tummy ache. But Haggis tastes nutty.”

Oh vegans, the shit we have to put up with.

Oh dear animals, the SHIT you have to put up with because of our ignorance.

 
12:53 pm 12:43 pm
"The greatest destructive force in the Amazon rainforest is clearing land for “cattle” ranching.

Every one who is against violence and injustice should consider becoming vegan because ANIMAL USE is great violence and most animal use is for trivial reasons of palate PLEASURE and we can easily meet our nutrition needs from plants (and non-animal sources).

Every ENVIRONMENTALIST should be vegan because animal agriculture and the capture and killing of “wild” animals for various reasons including killing animals to “protect livestock”, would not exist if there were no demand for animal products and no demand for animal use. Environmentalists should be vegan because a huge percentage of GHG are from animal use industry. Worldwatch Institute suggests 51% GHG are from the animal use sector.

Also we should be vegan because if we claim to want to PROTECT THE PLANET, we should naturally include the 99.99% of the planet’s population who are nonhuman.

We — humans - do not own the planet. The bottom line is ALL other animals (including domesticated animals) deserve at least one basic right — the right not to be used as property and veganism is THE step to taking that right seriously.

If we are against violence and injustice, then we need to be vegan.

"
 
12:31 pm 12:27 pm
"

When talking about animals, do you say “who,” or do you say, “that” —i.e., “this sweet cat *who* kept meowing,” or “sweet cat *that* kept meowing”?

Do you talk about someONE or someTHING?

"

"Here’s a really great article on using language in ways that doesn’t turn animals into objects. And if you’ve ever wondered what to say instead of “kill two birds with one stone,” there’s a great list of animal friendly alternatives for tons of common sayings, included!”
 
April 16, 2014 1:00 pm
Report: Large-Scale Survey of Vegans, Vegetarians, and Meat Reducers

"In the summer of 2013, Humane League Labs carried out a large-scale survey of vegans, vegetarians, semi-vegetarians, and omnivores to learn the demographic and diet change patterns of each group. With over 3,000 respondents, including over 1,500 vegans and vegetarians, the survey was the largest of its kind ever carried out. The goal of the survey was to enable vegan advocacy organizations to create more effective materials and messaging by learning more about each group and its eating patterns.

A total of 57 questions were posed to respondents. Statistical analysis was performed by Amit Steinberg, Gary Shapiro, and Shelley Hurwitz from Statistics Without Borders, to which we would like to extend our sincerest appreciation.

Results

Because the study is wide-ranging, the results are too extensive to summarize here. Instead, they have been compiled into a downloadable 57-page PDF report:  Diet Change and Demographic Characteristics of Vegans, Vegetarians, Semi-Vegetarians, and Omnivores.

Implications For Vegan Advocates

The results have important implications for groups carrying out vegan advocacy and meat reduction efforts. While specific implications are not detailed in the report, they are fairly straightforward upon reading.”

 
April 15, 2014 4:01 pm
"Very important. General rule for English speakers - if you don’t do it in the human context, don’t do it in the nonhuman context.
Just make a little effort to say “she or he” or “her or him” if you don’t know the sex. It’s a little effort with a very important social message.
Nonhuman animals are *persons*, not *things*. Therefore, we should refer to a nonhuman animal as a “she” or “he,” never as an “it.””

"Very important. General rule for English speakers - if you don’t do it in the human context, don’t do it in the nonhuman context.

Just make a little effort to say “she or he” or “her or him” if you don’t know the sex. It’s a little effort with a very important social message.

Nonhuman animals are *persons*, not *things*. Therefore, we should refer to a nonhuman animal as a “she” or “he,” never as an “it.””

(Source: facebook.com)

 
March 29, 2014 9:10 am
"

The term omnivorous doesn’t mean must eat some animal products. It means capable of subsisting on both plant and animal matter.

Of the two, we are able to thrive without eating any animal products; however, if we eat no plants, we die.

In fact, decades of scientific evidence have demonstrated that humans have no biological need to consume flesh, eggs or dairy products.

We can get all the nutrients we need from plant foods, without the unhealthy animal protein and cholesterol, and without inflicting needless suffering and death on billions of animals.

"

Free From Harm Staff Writers
 
8:57 am
Eating Animals: Addressing Our Most Common Justifications

We have been eating meat since the dawn of humankind.

“Prehistoric humans and their ancestors ate some amount of meat. There’s no question about that. However, an in-depth analysis by science writer Rob Dunn published in the Scientific American reports on recent studies indicating that Human Ancestors Were Nearly All Vegetarians.

But is what our ancestors ate really relevant to the very different circumstances we face today regarding our food choices and lifestyles? We are no more compelled to eat like our ancestors than we are to practice cannibalism, rape, slavery, murder, or any of the other violent traditions which are all an unfortunate part of our human legacy.”

 
March 28, 2014 4:29 pm

How many farm animals are killed each year for the average American (USA) ‘omnivore’?

"Dr. Harish Sethu at the blog CountingAnimals.com analyzed data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to find out. As of 2012, about 31 farm animals suffer and die for the average meat-eater. In rounded figures, the number of animals killed breaks down to:

28 chickens

1 turkey

1/2 pig

1/8 beef cow

1 1/3 farm-raised fish

The consumption of dairy and eggs adds about two more animals into the mix:

2 chickens (one laying hen, one male chick that is killed shortly after birth)

1/30 dairy cow

If we consider shellfish and wild fish, the numbers grow dramatically higher:

Over 225 fish

Over 151 shellfish

Most of the shellfish- such as shrimp, crabs, lobsters, and squids- are eaten directly. Some wild fish are consumed in the same way, but many are fed to farm-raised fish to help fatten them up. If those numbers of fish seem high to you, keep in mind that many fish - such as anchovies- are very small.

As you may have noticed, we’ve left out animals that are eaten in relatively small numbers, such as goats, rabbits, and sheep. We’re also ignoring the indirect ways that animals are killed in the meat production process. For example, we’re not including the fish and other wild animals killed when pollution from factory farms seeps into waterways. We’re also not including the wild animals who are killed by pesticide poisoning, or who are run over by farm threshing equipment, on corn and soy fields. (Vegetarians and vegans are responsible for some of these deaths as well, but not to the same degree as meat-eaters. Producing meat requires a lot of grain.)

For every cow they eat, Americans eat 190 chickens and kill over 1,400 fish.

For every pig they eat, Americans eat 60 chickens and kill over 450 fish.

In their entire adult life the average American omnivore will cause the death of about two dairy cows, eight beef cows, and 30 pigs. They’ll kill about 80 farm-raised fish, 120 egg industry hens, and a whopping 1,680 broiler chickens.

Over their entire adult life, the average American meat-eater is responsible for the killing of over 13,500 wild fish and 9,060 shellfish.”

-Nick Cooney, Veganomics: The Surprising Science on What Motivates Vegetarians, from the Breakfast Table to the Bedroom

 
March 24, 2014 4:28 pm

Is There Animal Fat in Your Plastic Bag? (2010) - My Plastic-Free Life

"Probably.  I visited a plastic bag factory.  I took a lot of pictures and asked a lot of questions. But I just had to share this tidbit of information right away:  most plastic bags (and other plastics, for that matter) contain “slip agents” to reduce the friction in the material.  And what are slip agents made from?  Mainly animal fat.

The factory owner I spoke with called it “chicken fat,” but according to an article I found afterwards, “Animal Derived Agents in Disposable Systems,” many of these slip agents are made from rendered beef tallow.  Apparently, manufacturers of biotechnology are concerned lately about beef fats used in plastic materials that come in contact with bioprocess fluids.  Why?  Because of prions. (Aka “mad cow disease.”)

Nice.

Rendered animals.  Just one more reason to avoid the plastic bag.”

Source
 
March 20, 2014 1:42 pm 10:19 am
"

I grew up eating chickens (and eggs and cheese and cows and turkeys and…) but that is not where the story ends. That was how I was raised, yes, but I have kept evolving. So have millions of other people who do not accept that our history is carved onto us as our destiny.

Still, how many times have I heard people say, in an attempt to justify current habits, that they “grew up on the veal parmigiana that my Nonna made” or “I was raised in a family that ate a lot of meat,” or “Polish food is very meat-centric and that was how I grew up,” or whatever it is that they say? A lot.

I’m going to hazard a guess that the concept of HISTORY AS DESTINY is a pretty ingrained one that many of us hold as true.

Also, in addition to our food culture, there are other family legacies we may have been raised with in our households. Legacies of abuse. Legacies of addiction. Legacies of all sorts of things we don’t necessarily want to carry over into in our own lives. These legacies may feel comfortable to us because they are familiar but if they harm ourselves or others, how can we justify not trying our best to break the cycle?

"

Marla Rose
 
9:57 am
 
9:09 am
“On Alice Walker and History as Destiny.” 
"Once considered a leading voice for compassionate living, Alice Walker has contradicted her famous words about animals existing for their own reasons, and rationalized eating them by saying that she "grew up eating chicken" as if this is unique, unusual, or justifiable. "When people say that they grew up eating animals as if this gives them a pass to continue doing so, to me they are implying that those who currently do not eat animals didn’t grow up the same way - but this is untrue. Also, in addition to our food culture, there are other family legacies we may have been raised with in our households. Legacies of abuse. Legacies of addiction. Legacies of all sorts of things we don’t necessarily want to carry over into in our own lives. These legacies may feel comfortable to us because they are familiar but if they harm ourselves or others, how can we justify not trying our best to break the cycle?” 
Also: That Alice Walker Animal Rights Quote

On Alice Walker and History as Destiny.”

"Once considered a leading voice for compassionate living, Alice Walker has contradicted her famous words about animals existing for their own reasons, and rationalized eating them by saying that she "grew up eating chicken" as if this is unique, unusual, or justifiable. 

"When people say that they grew up eating animals as if this gives them a pass to continue doing so, to me they are implying that those who currently do not eat animals didn’t grow up the same way - but this is untrue. Also, in addition to our food culture, there are other family legacies we may have been raised with in our households. Legacies of abuse. Legacies of addiction. Legacies of all sorts of things we don’t necessarily want to carry over into in our own lives. These legacies may feel comfortable to us because they are familiar but if they harm ourselves or others, how can we justify not trying our best to break the cycle?” 

Also: That Alice Walker Animal Rights Quote