EVERYTHING VEGAN

August 28, 2014 1:55 pm
True story…
"One particularly poor argument in defence of eating meat is that if humans did not eat animals, those animals would not have been brought into existence in the first place. Humans would simply not have bred them in the numbers they do breed them. 
The claim is that although these animals are killed, this cost to them is outweighed by the benefit to them of having been brought into existence. This is an appalling argument for many reasons. First, the lives of many of these animals are so bad that even if one rejected my argument one would still have to think that they were harmed by being brought into existence. Secondly, those who advance this argument fail to see that it could apply as readily to human babies that are produced only to be eaten. Here we see quite clearly that being brought into existence only to be killed for food is no benefit. It is only because killing animals is thought to be acceptable that the argument is thought to have any force.” 
- David Benatar, Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming into Existence, p. 3.

True story…

"One particularly poor argument in defence of eating meat is that if humans did not eat animals, those animals would not have been brought into existence in the first place. Humans would simply not have bred them in the numbers they do breed them.

The claim is that although these animals are killed, this cost to them is outweighed by the benefit to them of having been brought into existence. This is an appalling argument for many reasons. First, the lives of many of these animals are so bad that even if one rejected my argument one would still have to think that they were harmed by being brought into existence. Secondly, those who advance this argument fail to see that it could apply as readily to human babies that are produced only to be eaten. Here we see quite clearly that being brought into existence only to be killed for food is no benefit. It is only because killing animals is thought to be acceptable that the argument is thought to have any force.”


- David Benatar, Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming into Existence, p. 3.

(Source: facebook.com)

 
July 31, 2014 11:00 am
"Feeling attention starved? 
Desperate for a chance to get your big break? 
Want to get 98% of the population to pat you on the back and call your decision to join the meat-eating population again “brave”?
 Trying gaining fame and fortune as an ex-vegan in roughly five easy steps with our handy guide.” 
*Picture on the right: green smoothie with a bacon strip.*

"Feeling attention starved?

Desperate for a chance to get your big break?

Want to get 98% of the population to pat you on the back and call your decision to join the meat-eating population again “brave”?

Trying gaining fame and fortune as an ex-vegan in roughly five easy steps with our handy guide.”

*Picture on the right: green smoothie with a bacon strip.*

(Source: facebook.com)

 
July 30, 2014 1:01 pm
It’s not just extinction: meet defaunation
"Get ready to learn a new word: defaunation.

Fauna is the total collection of animals—both in terms of species diversity and abundance—in a given area. So, defaunation, much like deforestation, means the loss of animals in all its myriad forms, including extinction, extirpation, or population declines.


Though for emotional or aesthetic reasons we may lament the loss of large charismatic species, such as tigers, rhinos, and pandas, we now know that loss of animals, from the largest elephant to the smallest beetle, will also fundamentally alter the form and function of the ecosystems upon which we all depend,” writes Sacha Vignieri, an Associate Editor with Science in an introduction on the issue.  Starting with the bigger—more well-known—species, vertebrate populations on average have declined by over a quarter in the last forty years, according to a review paper in the issue. Such numbers are borne out by a lot of anecdotal reporting of the “empty forest” syndrome, where scientists are noticing more-and-more seemingly intact forests and other habitats that have been stripped of their medium to large vertebrates.  Meanwhile at least 322 vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, a trend in human-caused extinctions that likely began during the Pleistocene. Many additional vertebrates remain unrecorded for decades and could be extinct.

But “fauna” also extends to invertebrates, which really comprise the vast bulk of the world’s animals. Most of these animals—which includes everything from insects to mollusks and jellyfish to spiders—have been far less studied than the world’s vertebrates and so much less is known about how imperiled they are and their population trends. Still, the data that we do have is not good. A global review of 452 invertebrates find that these populations have fallen by 45 percent over the last 40 years. The best data is in the Lepidoptera family—moths and butterflies—which shows a drop in abundance of about 35 percent.”

Read more

It’s not just extinction: meet defaunation

"Get ready to learn a new word: defaunation.
Fauna is the total collection of animals—both in terms of species diversity and abundance—in a given area. So, defaunation, much like deforestation, means the loss of animals in all its myriad forms, including extinction, extirpation, or population declines.
Though for emotional or aesthetic reasons we may lament the loss of large charismatic species, such as tigers, rhinos, and pandas, we now know that loss of animals, from the largest elephant to the smallest beetle, will also fundamentally alter the form and function of the ecosystems upon which we all depend,” writes Sacha Vignieri, an Associate Editor with Science in an introduction on the issue.

Starting with the bigger—more well-known—species, vertebrate populations on average have declined by over a quarter in the last forty years, according to a review paper in the issue. Such numbers are borne out by a lot of anecdotal reporting of the “empty forest” syndrome, where scientists are noticing more-and-more seemingly intact forests and other habitats that have been stripped of their medium to large vertebrates.

Meanwhile at least 322 vertebrates have gone extinct since 1500, a trend in human-caused extinctions that likely began during the Pleistocene. Many additional vertebrates remain unrecorded for decades and could be extinct.

But “fauna” also extends to invertebrates, which really comprise the vast bulk of the world’s animals. Most of these animals—which includes everything from insects to mollusks and jellyfish to spiders—have been far less studied than the world’s vertebrates and so much less is known about how imperiled they are and their population trends. Still, the data that we do have is not good.

A global review of 452 invertebrates find that these populations have fallen by 45 percent over the last 40 years. The best data is in the Lepidoptera family—moths and butterflies—which shows a drop in abundance of about 35 percent.”

Read more
 
12:48 pm
Even the Gorillas and Bears in Our Zoos Are Hooked on Prozac
Excerpted from Animal Madness: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves by Laurel Braitman. Copyright ©2014 by Laurel Braitman. 
The Gorilla Who Got Thorazine in His Coca-Cola
One of the first nonhumans to be given psychopharmaceuticals as a patient (and not as a test subject) was a western lowland gorilla named Willie B., who was famous in Atlanta, Georgia. He was captured in Congo as an infant in the 1960s and sent to Zoo Atlanta, where he lived for 39 years, 27 of them alone in an indoor cage with a tire swing and a television.
According to Mel Richardson, who was working as a veterinarian at Zoo Atlanta at the time, Willie broke a glass window in his enclosure in the winter of 1970–71 and had to be transferred to a much smaller cage for six months while the glass was replaced with heavy metal bars.
“He weighed around 400 pounds, and the cage was way too small for him,” said Mel. “If he stood up and stretched each arm all the way out he could almost touch both sides of the cage at once.”
The vet staff put Thorazine in the Coca-Cola Willie drank in the morning. He responded to the drug as many institutionalized humans do: He shuffled back and forth across his cage with dulled eyes.

Dolphins, whales, sea lions, walruses, and other marine creatures in parks like SeaWorld have also been given psychotropic drugs for what their vets see as depression, anxiety, compulsive regurgitation, flank sucking, or other distressing behaviors. 
Two marine mammal veterinarians who have spent decades on staff or consulting for American animal-display facilities and the military’s marine mammal program told me that antidepressants and antipsychotics are commonly used but that “no one was going to talk to [me] about it.” Even they wouldn’t speak about the subject on the record.
The Polar Bear on Prozac
But we do know about Gus, one of the polar bears in the Central Park Zoo, who started compulsively swimming figure eights in his pool for up to 12 hours a day, every day, for months. When the zoo paid a behaviorist $25,000 to help him, something of a Gus moment took hold of the city. The bear was on the cover of Newsday, Letterman cracked jokes about him, and the Canadian band The Tragically Hip wrote a song called “What’s Troubling Gus?”
The zoo’s public affairs manager said that Gus’s story was so captivating because “it’s like Woody Allen always being in therapy—the idea that all New Yorkers are neurotic.” In the wake of the news coverage, people called in from around the country to ask how the bear was doing.
Gus lived in a 5,000-square-foot enclosure—less than .00009 percent of what his range in the Arctic would be. He was a major predator who, despite being born in captivity, no doubt still felt predatory impulses.
In fact when Gus first arrived from an Ohio zoo in 1988, his favorite game was stalking children from the underwater window in his pool. “He liked to see them scream and run in terror—it was a game,” the zoo’s animal supervisor told a reporter. But the zoo staff didn’t want Gus to scare children or their parents, so they put up barriers to keep visitors farther away from the window. Gus soon started to swim in endless figure eights.
Hoping to curb the neurotic behavior, the zoo hired Tim Desmond, an animal trainer who had trained the orca who played Willy in the film Free Willy. Desmond was able to reduce Gus’s compulsions by giving him new things to do, such as bear food puzzles or snacks that took him longer to eat: mackerel frozen in blocks of ice or chicken wrapped in rawhide.
The zoo redesigned his exhibit and installed a play area stocked with rubber trash cans and traffic cones that Gus could pretend-maul. They also put him on Prozac. I do not know how long he was on the drug, or even if it was as effective as his new exhibit and entertainment schedule, but eventually Gus’s compulsive swimming tapered off, though it never went away entirely.
The Gorillas Who Got Haldol, Valium, Klonopin, Zoloft, Paxil, Xanax, Buspar, Prozac, Ativan, Versed, Mellaril, and Beta-Blockers
Another case involves a whole troop of gorillas at the Franklin Park Zoo in Boston.
In 1998 a 12-year-old male gorilla named Kitombe arrived at the zoo. The first week there, introductions between Kit and the other gorillas went smoothly. But soon Kit became violent. He also quickly impregnated one of the female gorillas, Kiki.
Kit was deeply agitated about the pregnant Kiki and wouldn’t let any of the other gorillas in the exhibit near her. His ire was focused in particular on a 36-year-old female named Gigi, who was the oldest gorilla in the troop.
As Kit chased Gigi around the exhibit, she screamed and shook. He bit her, tried to drown her in the exhibit’s moat, and tore open her scalp from ear to ear. Gigi, an already anxiety-prone gorilla given to repeatedly regurgitating and reingesting her food, eating her own feces, and sometimes slamming it on the glass of the exhibit in front of visitors, became a nervous wreck.
The drugs gave Kit diarrhea and slowed him down a bit, but they didn’t make him less aggressive. The keepers weaned him off the Haldol and Prozac and started him on Zoloft, which didn’t work either.
After two months of this, Dr. Hayley Murphy, the head veterinarian at the time, found her way to Michael Mufson, a psychiatrist and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School.
They tried one last antipsychotic, risperidone, but after a few months with no change in the frequency of his attacks on Gigi, Kit was separated from the troop and put in a cement and steel holding area by himself. Sadly, this isolation period would last more than 10 years.
Mufson was more hopeful about his ability to help Gigi. He prescribed her a beta-blocker, the same drug that concert pianists take for nerves. She was on it for three months without much of an effect. Mufson then decided to try a combination of Xanax and Paxil. Gigi soon seemed slightly less anxious, but Kit still intimidated and bullied her. What actually worked was removing the violent gorilla from the rest of the troop, even if that didn’t help him. In the wake of Kit’s exile, Gigi was weaned off the drugs.
After their experiences at the zoo in Boston, Murphy and Mufson were curious about the use of psychopharmaceuticals in other captive gorillas, so they surveyed all U.S. and Canadian zoos with gorillas in their collections. Nearly half of the 31 institutions that responded had given psychopharmaceutical drugs to their gorillas. The most frequently prescribed were Haldol (haloperidol) and Valium (diazepam), though Klonopin, Zoloft, Paxil, Xanax, Buspar, Prozac, Ativan, Versed, and Mellaril had all been tried.
Mufson keeps photos of the Boston gorilla troop on his desk alongside pictures of his wife and children, and every year, he brings medical students on psychiatry rotations to the zoo to see the apes. Since he first began working with Gigi, Mufson has treated a number of gorillas in other American zoos. He also agitates for changes in their environments and daily routines.

Even the Gorillas and Bears in Our Zoos Are Hooked on Prozac

Excerpted from Animal Madness: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves by Laurel Braitman. Copyright ©2014 by Laurel Braitman.

The Gorilla Who Got Thorazine in His Coca-Cola

One of the first nonhumans to be given psychopharmaceuticals as a patient (and not as a test subject) was a western lowland gorilla named Willie B., who was famous in Atlanta, Georgia. He was captured in Congo as an infant in the 1960s and sent to Zoo Atlanta, where he lived for 39 years, 27 of them alone in an indoor cage with a tire swing and a television.

According to Mel Richardson, who was working as a veterinarian at Zoo Atlanta at the time, Willie broke a glass window in his enclosure in the winter of 1970–71 and had to be transferred to a much smaller cage for six months while the glass was replaced with heavy metal bars.

“He weighed around 400 pounds, and the cage was way too small for him,” said Mel. “If he stood up and stretched each arm all the way out he could almost touch both sides of the cage at once.”

The vet staff put Thorazine in the Coca-Cola Willie drank in the morning. He responded to the drug as many institutionalized humans do: He shuffled back and forth across his cage with dulled eyes.
Dolphins, whales, sea lions, walruses, and other marine creatures in parks like SeaWorld have also been given psychotropic drugs for what their vets see as depression, anxiety, compulsive regurgitation, flank sucking, or other distressing behaviors.

Two marine mammal veterinarians who have spent decades on staff or consulting for American animal-display facilities and the military’s marine mammal program told me that antidepressants and antipsychotics are commonly used but that “no one was going to talk to [me] about it.” Even they wouldn’t speak about the subject on the record.

The Polar Bear on Prozac

But we do know about Gus, one of the polar bears in the Central Park Zoo, who started compulsively swimming figure eights in his pool for up to 12 hours a day, every day, for months. When the zoo paid a behaviorist $25,000 to help him, something of a Gus moment took hold of the city. The bear was on the cover of Newsday, Letterman cracked jokes about him, and the Canadian band The Tragically Hip wrote a song called “What’s Troubling Gus?”

The zoo’s public affairs manager said that Gus’s story was so captivating because “it’s like Woody Allen always being in therapy—the idea that all New Yorkers are neurotic.” In the wake of the news coverage, people called in from around the country to ask how the bear was doing.

Gus lived in a 5,000-square-foot enclosure—less than .00009 percent of what his range in the Arctic would be. He was a major predator who, despite being born in captivity, no doubt still felt predatory impulses.

In fact when Gus first arrived from an Ohio zoo in 1988, his favorite game was stalking children from the underwater window in his pool. “He liked to see them scream and run in terror—it was a game,” the zoo’s animal supervisor told a reporter. But the zoo staff didn’t want Gus to scare children or their parents, so they put up barriers to keep visitors farther away from the window. Gus soon started to swim in endless figure eights.

Hoping to curb the neurotic behavior, the zoo hired Tim Desmond, an animal trainer who had trained the orca who played Willy in the film Free Willy. Desmond was able to reduce Gus’s compulsions by giving him new things to do, such as bear food puzzles or snacks that took him longer to eat: mackerel frozen in blocks of ice or chicken wrapped in rawhide.

The zoo redesigned his exhibit and installed a play area stocked with rubber trash cans and traffic cones that Gus could pretend-maul. They also put him on Prozac. I do not know how long he was on the drug, or even if it was as effective as his new exhibit and entertainment schedule, but eventually Gus’s compulsive swimming tapered off, though it never went away entirely.

The Gorillas Who Got Haldol, Valium, Klonopin, Zoloft, Paxil, Xanax, Buspar, Prozac, Ativan, Versed, Mellaril, and Beta-Blockers

Another case involves a whole troop of gorillas at the Franklin Park Zoo in Boston.

In 1998 a 12-year-old male gorilla named Kitombe arrived at the zoo. The first week there, introductions between Kit and the other gorillas went smoothly. But soon Kit became violent. He also quickly impregnated one of the female gorillas, Kiki.

Kit was deeply agitated about the pregnant Kiki and wouldn’t let any of the other gorillas in the exhibit near her. His ire was focused in particular on a 36-year-old female named Gigi, who was the oldest gorilla in the troop.

As Kit chased Gigi around the exhibit, she screamed and shook. He bit her, tried to drown her in the exhibit’s moat, and tore open her scalp from ear to ear. Gigi, an already anxiety-prone gorilla given to repeatedly regurgitating and reingesting her food, eating her own feces, and sometimes slamming it on the glass of the exhibit in front of visitors, became a nervous wreck.

The drugs gave Kit diarrhea and slowed him down a bit, but they didn’t make him less aggressive. The keepers weaned him off the Haldol and Prozac and started him on Zoloft, which didn’t work either.

After two months of this, Dr. Hayley Murphy, the head veterinarian at the time, found her way to Michael Mufson, a psychiatrist and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School.

They tried one last antipsychotic, risperidone, but after a few months with no change in the frequency of his attacks on Gigi, Kit was separated from the troop and put in a cement and steel holding area by himself. Sadly, this isolation period would last more than 10 years.

Mufson was more hopeful about his ability to help Gigi. He prescribed her a beta-blocker, the same drug that concert pianists take for nerves. She was on it for three months without much of an effect. Mufson then decided to try a combination of Xanax and Paxil. Gigi soon seemed slightly less anxious, but Kit still intimidated and bullied her. What actually worked was removing the violent gorilla from the rest of the troop, even if that didn’t help him. In the wake of Kit’s exile, Gigi was weaned off the drugs.

After their experiences at the zoo in Boston, Murphy and Mufson were curious about the use of psychopharmaceuticals in other captive gorillas, so they surveyed all U.S. and Canadian zoos with gorillas in their collections. Nearly half of the 31 institutions that responded had given psychopharmaceutical drugs to their gorillas. The most frequently prescribed were Haldol (haloperidol) and Valium (diazepam), though Klonopin, Zoloft, Paxil, Xanax, Buspar, Prozac, Ativan, Versed, and Mellaril had all been tried.

Mufson keeps photos of the Boston gorilla troop on his desk alongside pictures of his wife and children, and every year, he brings medical students on psychiatry rotations to the zoo to see the apes. Since he first began working with Gigi, Mufson has treated a number of gorillas in other American zoos. He also agitates for changes in their environments and daily routines.

 
July 28, 2014 11:02 pm
"Our movements are forging new tools and a new sensibility
that will get us through these dark times."

Beautiful Trouble
 
10:40 pm
"Someone has to save the planet, billions of innocent animals, and humanity from hunger, disease, war, violence, and climate change – and it won’t be the people telling you to eat “humane”, free-range, cage-free, organic, grass-fed “meat”, dairy, fish, and eggs…It WILL be the people attending the Los Angeles area -
WORLD VEGAN SUMMIT & EXPO March 20-22, 2015 Marina del Rey Marriott
World-Renowned Speakers, Thinkers and Doers, Movers and Shakers, Activists and Academics, Authors and Advocates, Athletes and Chefs Come Together to Create A Vegan World and Support Abolition of the Use of Animals
Music, Food, and Fun
Spectacularly Creative Vegan Cuisine – featuring VEGANIC (vegan organic) produce, prepared using cutting boards, knives, and cookware never used for “meat”, dairy, fish, and eggs.
The WORLD VEGAN SUMMIT & EXPO is a grass roots effort being organized by Bob Linden of Go Vegan Radio”

"Someone has to save the planet, billions of innocent animals, and humanity from hunger, disease, war, violence, and climate change – and it won’t be the people telling you to eat “humane”, free-range, cage-free, organic, grass-fed “meat”, dairy, fish, and eggs…It WILL be the people attending the Los Angeles area -

WORLD VEGAN SUMMIT & EXPO
March 20-22, 2015
Marina del Rey Marriott

World-Renowned Speakers, Thinkers and Doers, Movers and Shakers, Activists and Academics, Authors and Advocates, Athletes and Chefs Come Together to Create A Vegan World and Support Abolition of the Use of Animals

Music, Food, and Fun

Spectacularly Creative Vegan Cuisine – featuring VEGANIC (vegan organic) produce, prepared using cutting boards, knives, and cookware never used for “meat”, dairy, fish, and eggs.

The WORLD VEGAN SUMMIT & EXPO is a grass roots effort being organized by Bob Linden of Go Vegan Radio

 
July 23, 2014 10:58 am

"Brilliant spin on the Orange Is the New Black intro by Mercy For Animals.”

 
July 17, 2014 9:08 am

Why Organic Meat, Dairy and Eggs Are Not Sustainable

Considerably more land is required to produce organic meat, dairy and eggs than inorganic — in some cases more than double. This higher land use is associated with higher emissions of harmful substances like ammonia, phosphate equivalents, and carbon dioxide equivalents. Grass-fed, organic cattle generate four times the methane that grain-fed, inorganic cattle do.

Then there’s the water: pound for pound, it takes up to one hundred times more water to produce animal protein than grain protein. The 3 million gallons used to raise a single, half-ton beef steer would comfortably float a battleship. Organic cattle require 10 percent less water than inorganic but still need 2.7 million gallons each during their lives, enough to fill 130 residential swimming pools.

In light of the orders-of-magnitude difference in water needed to raise plant and animal protein, does a 10 percent savings for organic cattle really matter? Looked at another way, if Fred litters ten times a day while Mary litters only nine times, is Mary’s behavior really good for the environment? The value of such comparisons is dubious.

Source

 
July 16, 2014 11:43 am

Chegan

http://www.vegan.com/chegan/

"Chegan (pronounced chee-gen) is slang for a cheating vegan. It describes someone who eats vegan nearly all the time, but deliberately slips up—probably most often in the presence of pizza or ice cream (see: Bill Clinton). Other chegans are stricter about avoiding visible quantities of animal products, but are inclined to say “fuck it” when the substance in question is a food’s nineteenth ingredient.

Predictably, many Level 5 Vegans view chegans as the worst kinds of heretics, and reserve for them a level of scorn they’d never heap upon someone who ate meat by the cartload (see: Vegan Police). This of course makes no sense, as people who are decidedly on the vegan end of the spectrum ought to be commended for all they’re doing to minimize their consumption of animal products.

Rest assured that the meat industry is at least as threatened by chegans as vegans. After all, the industry as we know it will collapse once the majority of people refuse to make animal products a significant part of their diet. And pragmatists are inherently more likely than perfectionists to sway the outcome of crucial battles.

Note: the author is an (only occasionally insufferable) Level 5 Vegan who believes chegans will be decisive in wiping out animal agribusiness.”«

This site is associated with Erik Marcus.

 
July 9, 2014 5:45 pm
The latest essay from Marla Rose -The Vegan Feminist Agitator: “The Orthorexia Dilemma: Is Veganism an Eating Disorder?”
"With high profile bloggers giving up being vegan and blaming veganism for their eating disorders, is there anything to see there? Is it all just an attempt to get attention and broaden a fan base? Are there ways to minimize our participation in a food disordered framing of veganism? Written from the perspective of someone who has had an eating disorder, I think exploring this topic is worthy of our time."

The latest essay from Marla Rose -The Vegan Feminist Agitator: “The Orthorexia Dilemma: Is Veganism an Eating Disorder?”

"With high profile bloggers giving up being vegan and blaming veganism for their eating disorders, is there anything to see there? Is it all just an attempt to get attention and broaden a fan base? Are there ways to minimize our participation in a food disordered framing of veganism? Written from the perspective of someone who has had an eating disorder, I think exploring this topic is worthy of our time."

 
3:06 pm

(Source: facebook.com)

 
July 8, 2014 8:47 pm
Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you The Humane Society of the United States
#promoting animal exploitation

Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you The Humane Society of the United States

#promoting animal exploitation

(Source: facebook.com)

 
10:34 am
"

Many people say, “I’m proud to be a vegan.”

I never consider myself proud to be a vegan. If you are proud of some aspect of yourself, it tends to make you give off an air of superiority that may impede communication. I am not saying that this will happen with everyone or on every occasion. I am just saying that pride can cause trouble.

I actually think of myself as very lucky to have been able to see this issue because it’s changed my life in so many positive ways. But, in many ways, it was luck. I was fortunate. I have known many bright, thoughtful, very nice caring people over the years who are very progressive thinkers but who just can’t “see” the issue. I did. I was lucky.

If you approach it that way, when you talk to people, you convey a different vibe: that you have something valuable that you want to share with them. You want to give them something important to you. You have a gift to give them. In my view, it’s a better vibe. It facilitates education.

"
 
July 3, 2014 8:53 am
"'How on earth do animals like elephants, gorillas and oxen get so big and strong eating only plants? A diverse plant-based diet can obviously support a big, powerful body.' Sure it can. If you’re an elephant or a gorilla or an ox."

Remember that time when meat eaters compared themselves to lions and bears…?

Junk science is embarassing:

“Broccoli has more protein than steak”—and other crap

 
June 26, 2014 10:47 pm
"Gettin’ a little tired here of the humane meat myth. Being “nice” to a non-human animal does not entitle you to their body. This is the same logic that allows men to think being nice to a woman entitles him to HER body. If you don’t see the intersection between feminism and animal rights, your eyes are closed. But whatever. I ain’t one to gossip."